Congratulations on joining the ranks of our amazing LulzBot 3D Printer users!

Refer to the LulzBot Mini Quick Start Guide for detailed unpacking instructions and step-by-step guides through your first 3D print.

Table of Contents

 

Warnings & Safety Information

WARNING!

READ THIS COMPLETELY BEFORE UNPACKING AND POWERING UP YOUR PRINTER.

Hazards and Warnings
Your LulzBot 3D printer has motorized and heated parts. Always be aware of possible hazards when the printer is operational.

Electric Shock Hazard
Never open the electronics case when the printer is powered on. Before removing the electronics case cover, always power down the printer and completely turn off and unplug the printer. Allow the printer to discharge for at least one minute.

Burn Hazard
Never touch the hot end nozzle or heater block without first turning off the hot end and allowing it to completely cool down. The hot end can take up to 20 minutes to completely cool. Never touch recently extruded plastic. The plastic can stick to your skin and cause burns. The print surface can reach high temperatures that are capable of causing burns.

Fire Hazard
Never place flammable materials or liquids on or near the printer when it is powered on or operational. Liquid acetone, alcohol, or other chemicals may release vapors that are extremely flammable.

Pinch Hazard
When the printer is operational take care to never put your fingers near any moving parts including belts, pulleys, or gears. Tie back long hair or clothing that can get caught in the moving parts of the printer.

Age Warning
For users under the age of 18, adult supervision is recommended. Beware of choking hazards around small children.

Modifications and Repairs Warning
At Aleph Objects, Inc., we respect your freedom to modify your LulzBot Desktop 3D Printer. However any modifications or attempted repairs that cause damage are not covered under the Warranty. Questions? Contact Technical Support by visiting LulzBot.com/Support, by emailing support@lulzbot.com, or by calling +1-970-377-1111.

 

Regulatory Statements

Regulatory Compliance Statement Class B

Federal Communications Commission Statement
This device complies with part 15 class B of the FCC Rules. Operation is subject to the following two conditions:
1. This device may not cause harmful interference and
2. This device must accept any interference received, including interference that may cause undesired operation.

NOTE: This equipment has been tested and found to comply with the limits for a Class B digital device, pursuant to part 15 of the FCC Rules.

These limits are designed to provide reasonable protection against harmful interference in a residential installation. This equipment generates, uses and can radiate radio frequency energy and, if not installed and used in accordance with the instructions, may cause harmful interference to radio communications. However, there is no guarantee that interference will not occur in a particular installation. If this equipment does cause harmful interference to radio or television reception, which can be determined by turning the equipment off and on, the user is encouraged to try to correct the interference by one or more of the following measures:

1. Reorient or relocate the receiving antenna.
2. Increase the separation between the equipment and receiver.
3. Connect the equipment into an outlet on a circuit different from that
to which the receiver is connected.
4. Consult the dealer or an experienced radio/TV technician for help.

FCC Warning: Changes or modifications not approved by the party responsible for compliance could void the users authority to operate the equipment.

Industry Canada Statement

CAN ICES-3 (B)/NMB-3(B) Cet appareil numérique de la classe B est conforme à la norme ICES-003 du Canada. This device complies with Canadian ICES-003 Class B.

Australian Communications and Media Authority Statement
This device has been tested and found to comply with the limits for a Class B digital device, pursuant to the Australian/New Zealand standard AS/NZS CISPR 22:2009 + A1:2010.

 

Recommended Software

 

All of the following Free/Libre Software packages are available for GNU/Linux, Windows, and Mac OS X. We highly recommend using these programs on GNU/Linux.

3D Printer Hosts

A 3D printer host communicates to a 3D printer and can be used to manually move the printer along all the axes of motion, set temperatures manually, send commands, and receive feedback/error messages from the onboard control electronics.

Cura LulzBot Edition

Cura LulzBot Edition is the recommended software for your LulzBot 3D Printer. Download the latest version today, for free, from LulzBot.com/Cura.

Cura LE is a Free Software program that both prepares your files for printing by converting your model into G-code and allows you to control the operation of your LulzBot 3D printer.

Keep Cura LE updated to have the latest filament slicing profiles, developed and tested by the LulzBot team to ensure the best performance out of your LulzBot!

Cura LE: Automatic LulzBot Driver Installation

Cura LulzBot Edition will automatically install the required drivers for Windows users during the installation process. GNU/Linux and OS X users will not need to install drivers to communicate with the LulzBot Mini 2 3D printer. If your school or workplace requires a manual driver installation process, the drivers can be downloaded from LulzBot.com/downloads.

Alternative Printer Host Software

OctoPrint

Available at OctoPrint.org:

OctoPrint is the leading networked 3D printer host that uses a web-based interface to access and control your 3D printer. Added web-cam functionality allows for time-lapse videos and even a live stream. OctoPrint will run on GNU/Linux, Windows, and Mac OS X operating systems, and can even run well on a Beagle Bone Black or a RaspberryPi (inexpensive business-card sized computers).

BotQueue

Available at BotQueue.com:

BotQueue works well for those users wanting to have a web-based queuing system for operating multiple 3D printers.

MatterControl

Available at MatterHackers.com/MatterControl:

MatterControl is another printer host that currently runs on GNU/Linux, Windows, and OS X. It features 2D and 3D model viewing, a print queue, and print file organization and searching.

Slicers & Slicing Engines

Slicers determine the ideal 3D printer tool path based on the options selected and desired finish to turn a 3D model (typically STL/OBJ/etc) into your desired object.

The slicing engine uses the nozzle diameter, movement speeds, layer height, and other variables to determine the coordinates needed to move the tool head, and the rates at which it will do so. This information is exported out of the program as a G-code file. This G-code file is a plain-text file with a series of letter-based codes and a list of the complete X,Y, and Z-axis coordinates used for printing the 3D model.

We recommend using Cura LulzBot Edition as it includes a slicing engine and pre-set filament slicing profiles.

CAD and 3D Modeling Software

A Free/Libre slicer like Cura LulzBot Edition will support many of the 3D model file types generated by Free/Libre Software design applications. Other common non-free CAD and 3D modeling software options may be capable of exporting the required 3D model file types.

Recommended 3D Model Parameters

  • Design Units: Millimeters
  • Output File: STL
  • Some design applications do not use millimeters by default and instead use imperial or application-specific units of measure. If you are unable to change the program's units of measure, scale the model by 25.40 to compensate for inch-based design units. The recommended design software options listed below use millimeters by default.

    FreeCAD

    From FreeCAD.org:

    "FreeCAD is a parametric 3D modeler made primarily to design real-life objects of any size. Parametric modeling allows you to easily modify your design by going back into your model history and changing its parameters. FreeCAD is open-source and highly customizable, scriptable and extensible."

    Your LulzBot Mini 2 was designed in FreeCAD! Find the design files in the Source files included with your 3D printer.

    OpenSCAD

    From OpenSCAD.org:

    "OpenSCAD is software for creating solid 3D CAD models. It is free software and available for Linux/UNIX, Windows and Mac OS X. Unlike most free software for creating 3D models (such as Blender) it does not focus on the artistic aspects of 3D modelling but instead on the CAD aspects. Thus it might be the application you are looking for when you are planning to create 3D models of machine parts but pretty sure is not what you are looking for when you are more interested in creating computer-animated movies.

    OpenSCAD is not an interactive modeler. Instead it is something like a 3D-compiler that reads in a script file that describes the object and renders the 3D model from this script file. This gives you (the designer) full control over the modeling process and enables you to easily change any step in the modeling process or make designs that are defined by configurable parameters."

    BlocksCAD

    From BlocksCAD.org:

    "BlocksCAD is based on the open-source programming language OpenSCAD, a powerful and popular language in the 3D maker community. BlocksCAD's block-based interface makes programming accessible to students as young as 3rd grade (8 years old), but is powerful enough to continue making sophisticated designs through high school."

    Blender

    From Blender.org:

    "Blender is the free and open source 3D creation suite. It supports the entirety of the 3D pipeline—modeling, rigging, animation, simulation, rendering, compositing and motion tracking, even video editing and game creation."

    Blender is the most widely used Free/Libre Software 3D modeling software, so much so that we are able to use Blender to create 3D models, and as our video editing suite. Blender is well documented with tutorials available through Blender.org and more.

     

    Cura LulzBot Edition

     

    Cura LulzBot Edition is the recommended software for your LulzBot 3D Printer. Download the latest version today, for free, from LulzBot.com/Cura.

    Cura LE is a Free Software program that can be utilized by many 3D printers using the Fused Filament Fabrication (FFF) process. Fused Filament Fabrication is the term for the process of laying down successive layers of extruded filament to create a three dimensional object. As each layer of molten plastic is extruded into place, it fuses with the previous layer.

    Cura LE prepares your 3D model for printing by converting your design into G-code and allows you to control the operation of your LulzBot 3D printer.

    Keep Cura LE updated to have the latest filament slicing profiles, developed and tested by the LulzBot team to ensure the best performance out of your LulzBot!

    Automatic LulzBot Driver Installation

    Cura LulzBot Edition will automatically install the required drivers for Windows users during the installation process. GNU/Linux and OS X users will not need to install drivers to communicate with the LulzBot Mini 2 3D printer. If your school or workplace requires a manual driver installation process, the drivers can be downloaded from LulzBot.com/downloads.

    This basic guide is designed to outline the fundamentals of using Cura LulzBot Edition software with your LulzBot 3D Printer. Want more information? In Cura LulzBot Edition, hover over each option to view the details on individual settings.

    Cura LulzBot Edition: Quick Start Guide

    Watch the Cura LulzBot Edition Quick Start Guide at LulzBot.com/cura-qsg

     

    Cura LulzBot Edition: Installation Overview

    Download and install Cura LE by following the detailed download, installation, and removal instructions for your computer's operating system at LulzBot.com/Cura.

    Uninstall any previous versions of Cura you may have been using when upgrading. Follow the instructions available at LulzBot.com/Cura.

    Start Cura LE by launching it from your list of installed applications. If this is the first time that Cura LE has been installed on this computer, the Configuration Wizard window will open.

    It is important to select the correct printer as Cura LE uses pre-set filament slicing profiles and machine settings based upon the 3D printer model selected.

    Select LulzBot Mini 2.

    Click Next through the remaining windows. End the setup process by clicking Finish.

    Using Cura LulzBot Edition

     

    After setting up Cura LE for the first time, a 3D model of the LulzBot Rock2pus will load onto the virtual print bed. This model can also be accessed by selecting File Open Recent and selecting Rock2pus.

    Load the Rock2pus model now.

     

    Supported File Types

    Cura LulzBot Edition supports many of the file types used by many popular 3D modeling and design applications.

    Currently, Cura LE supports the following 3D model file types:

    • 3MF
    • G
    • G-code
    • STL
    • OBJ
    • X3D

    Cura LE can also convert the following image types into a height map, for 3D printed lithographs:

    • BMP
    • GIF
    • JPEG
    • JPG
    • PNG

     

    Navigating Within Cura LE

     
     

    1. Virtual Print Surface
    2. Axis Indicator
    3. Print Area
    4. Prepare Tab
    5. Monitor Print Tab
    6. Open File
    7. Move
    8. Scale
    9. Rotate
    10. Mirror
    11. Per-model settings
    12. Multiply Object
    13. G-code File Name Text Box
    14. Edit G-code File Name
    15. 3D Model Dimensions

     

    Controlling the Cura LE Viewpoint

    Use your mouse or trackpad to move the camera view. Hold down the right mouse button on GNU/Linux and Windows, or Control on Mac OSX, and move your mouse to rotate the virtual print bed.

    Hold the middle button, or shift while clicking to pan up, down, left, and right.

     

    3D Model Manipulation

    The buttons on the left-hand side of the Cura LE interface are used to manipulate the 3D model on the virtual print surface.

    Move

    Cura LE adds more precision to positioning your objects on the virtual print bed. Move your model using a handle for each axis (red for X, green for Y, blue for Z) or by entering in the position for each axis for more precise movement.

    Values entered are relative to the current displayed position. Negative Z-axis movements can be used to cut off the bottom of the model and start the print where it intersects the virtual print bed, useful for improving adhesion on models without flat bases.

    Note: The Lock Model check box prevents mouse-based movements. Manual numerical axis movements are still allowed when checked.

     

    Scale

    Adjust the size of the model using values entered in millimeters or percentages. Snap Scaling uses increments of 10% when using the red/blue/green axis boxes to drag and scale. Uniform scaling is selected by default, to keep the 3D model aspect ratio the same.

    Restore the original scaling by pressing the Reset button.

    The Scale To Max button will enlarge a model to fill the maximum build area.

     

    Rotate

    Orient your model along all three axes by clicking the Rotate button. Three colored circles will surround your model, centered along the model midpoint. The Blue circle will allow you to rotate around the Z axis. The Green circle is used to rotate around the Y axis. The Red circle will rotate around the X axis.

    The Lay Flat button will attempt to place the model onto the print surface using the flattest portion.

    The Snap Rotation button will use 15° increments.

    Restore the original orientation by pressing the Reset button.

     

    Mirror

    Use the red, green, and blue arrows to mirror the model along that axis.

    Right click using your mouse and select Reset All Model Transformations to undo these changes.

     

    Per-model Settings

    Change or assign model-specific slicing settings when printing more than one model at a time.

    NOTE: This button will only be enabled when in Custom Mode, and when the Special Mode of Print Sequence: One at at time is active. This setting is only recommended for expert users.

     

    Multiply Object

    Select the desired model. Press the Multiply Object button to open the Multiply Selected Model window.

    Enter the amount of desired additional models.

     

    Camera Positions

    The buttons along the top of the Cura LE interface include five preset camera positions:

    • 3D View
    • Front
    • Top
    • Left
    • Right

     

    View Type

    Change your view type by selecting an option from the top dropdown menu:

    • Solid view: The default viewing mode
    • X-Ray view: View any interior structures of the model
    • Layer view: Also known as G-code Preview, scroll through each layer of your print by changing to this view.

     

    Using Layer View for G-code Previews

    Use Layer View to visualize the movements generated by Cura LE, or contained within a G-code file. Layer View even includes an animated layer-by-layer printing preview.

    Note: Some users with legacy video hardware may not be able to use the more complex visual display options.

    Material Color

    This option shows the extrusion paths and movements using the default color for the material selected.

     

    Line Type

    Use Line Type to show the movements in different colors.

     

    Feedrate

    This option will use a color gradient to display the movement speed throughout each layer.

     

    Layer Thickness

    The Layer thickness option uses a color gradient to show the different layer heights used throughout the model. This is especially helpful when using the experimental adaptive layer feature.

     

    Print Setup

    The right-hand side of the Cura LE window contains the Print Setup interface. The options here allow for switching between 3D printers, materials sorted by ease of use and by name, and preset slicing profiles of varying qualities and options.

     
     

    1. 3D Printer Selection & Management
    2. Tool Head Info
    3. Printer Info
    4. Filament Recommended Skill Level
    5. Filament List
    6. Filament Product Page & Information
    7. Slicing Profiles
    8. Recommended vs Custom Selection
    9. Infill Slider
    10. Gradual Support Checkbox
    11. Support Material Checkbox
    12. Build Plate Adhesion
    13. Slicing Progress Indicator
    14. Estimated Print Time
    15. Estimated Required Filament Length
    16. Estimated Required Filament Weight
    17. Save File Button

    Filament Categories

    The Category dropdown is used to organize the many supported and experimental filament types by user skill level.

     

    The categories are:

    All: This category includes all supported filament materials and brands.

    Beginner: These materials require little-to-no additional steps or equipment to print cleanly, reliably, and provide a balance between cost and strength.

    Intermediate: The filaments included in this category have specialized characteristics such as strength, finish, or post-processing needs, and may include additional recommended equipment like enclosures.

    Advanced: These materials may require treating the PEI print surface for improved adhesion or release. These materials may also require additional post-processing to achieve the desired final finish.

    Expert: Some materials may warp at larger scales, require print surface treatment, or may need to be printed on the bare glass surface of the Modular Print Bed System.

    Experimental: Find even more out of the box compatibility in this category from new third-party vendors, exciting new materials, and more. Note: These materials may not be actively supported by the LulzBot technical support team at this time.

    Material

    Different manufacturers have different formulations for their specific brand. These different formulations may have different ideal settings. We highly recommend using the filament brands listed in Cura LulzBot Edition. Beautiful 3D printed objects start with reliable and consistent filament. These slicing profiles will be good starting points for other manufacturers, but they may not be ideal.

    Choose your filament here. While some materials may be similar, each brand may require different speed and temperature settings.

    Click on the informational link to view filament details and specifications at LulzBot.com.

    Some materials can benefit from treating the print surface with PVA-based glue stick. Any filament with this characteristic will have that noted in a new Adhesion Info information box.

     

    Choosing a Print Profile

    Choose your desired print quality or characteristics with the Profile dropdown. Some specialized filaments may only have a single profile. The value listed after the profile name is the average layer height used for the print.

     

    Standard: A balance of speed, surface finish, and detail, this setting is recommended for most 3D prints.

    High Detail: A smaller layer height and slower speeds are used to maximize part appearance while leading to longer print times.

    High Speed: Perfect for prototypes, or when printing time matters most. These profiles use a larger layer height.

    High Strength: Strong, dependable parts can be achieved by balancing excellent layer adhesion with wide extrusion widths and walls.

    High Clarity: Translucent materials can look even better when printed at large, or even excessively large layer heights.

     

    Recommended vs Custom

    These built-in recommended settings have been tested by 3D printing experts and are designed to offer reliable, great looking prints, reel after reel, model after model.

    At times, you may want to adjust specific settings to achieve challenging geometries or features. Switching to Custom mode will display many of the hundreds of individual settings, special modes, and experimental features. Switch back to Recommended mode to restore the expert-developed built-in slicing profiles.

    Tip: Access more information on each setting by hovering each setting.

    Tip: Change only one setting at a time, and print your object to see the result. By minimizing your variables, you'll learn how each setting can influence your final print outcome.

    Tip: Looking for a particular slicing setting among all the options? Use the search bar above the list of settings to quickly find what you need.

     

    Infill

    Balance material use, print speed, and print weight with the recommended print infill setting of 20%. A higher infill percentage can result in stronger object, for example your LulzBot 3D Printer is built with ABS parts 3D printed with a 60% or higher infill.

     

    Generate Support

    The LulzBot Mini 2 3D printer is able to print models that have angles and overhangs, even without support material. Turn this option on if sections of the model extend out away from the model. This will build up material underneath the portion extending in mid-air, preventing drooping or sagging.

     
     

    Build Plate Adhesion

    The slicing profiles included within Cura LE will use a skirt to prime the hot end to ensure that sufficient material is being extruded prior to starting on the actual object.

    The Brim option can improve printed part adhesion to the print surface by increasing the surface area of the first layer.

    The Raft option uses a larger, multi-layered base to improve part adhesion. In general, Skirt is preferred.

     
     

    Save to File | Print via USB

    If a printer is not connected to the computer, this button will be labeled with Save to File. If an SD card is mounted, you will also see a Save to Removable Drive option which will save the G-code file to your SD card using the 3D model file name. A progress bar will reach 100% when the file has been saved to your SD card.

    If the LulzBot Mini 2 is connected through the USB cable to a computer this button will display Print via USB. Click on the drop down arrow to access the file save options.

     

    Cura LE Video Quick Start Guides

    Is this your first time printing with the LulzBot Mini 2? Follow the LulzBot Mini 2 Quick Start Guide video for a step-by-step guide.

    Watch the video and refer to the Cura LulzBot Edition Quick Start Guide, available at LulzBot.com/Cura-QSG, for a general guide on 3D printing through Cura LulzBot Edition.

     

    Print Monitor

    The Print Monitor is used to monitor progress and control the LulzBot Mini 2 when connected to your computer using the supplied USB cable.

     
     
     

    Monitor Print Interface

    1. Monitor Tab
    2. Connect Button
    3. Connection Status
    4. Hot End Temperature Entry Box
    5. Hot End Pre-heat (set temperature) Button
    6. Build Plate Temperature Entry Box
    7. Build Plate Pre-heat (set temperature) Button
    8. Temperature History Graph
    9. Active Print Information
    10. G-code File Name
    11. Estimated Total Printing Time
    12. Estimated Time Remaining
    13. Actual Print Time
    14. Manual Movement Control
    15. Connect through USB button
    16. Printer Positional Controls
    17. Extruder Controls
    18. Home X- and Y-axis Button
    19. Home Z-axis Button
    20. Additional Functions

    Access the Print Monitor by clicking the Monitor tab (1) in the top portion of the Cura LE window.

     

    3D Printing Directly Through Cura LE

    3D printing through Cura LE is easy! Follow the steps below to 3D print your Rock2pus.

    For this print we will be using Polylite PLA filament. On the right-hand of the screen under material, select “Polylite PLA (Polymaker).”

     

    Once the material has been selected, under profile, select "Standard."

     

    In the top-right corner of the screen, click the “Print Monitor” (1) button to open the printer control menu. Next, click “Connect”(2) to establish a connection between your computer and printer.

     

    Click “Preheat nozzle”(3) to to raise the hot end temperature. For Polylite PLA, the temperature will raise to 205°C.

    Using a different material? Set the hot end to the extrusion temperature of your material to remove the filament from the LulzBot Aerostruder Tool Head. Refer to the Filament Guide below for the proper extrusion temperature.

     

    Once the printer has reached at least 200°C, you can remove any remaining filament and replace it with your new filament. Click the "Extrude" button a few times to purge any leftover filament. Repeat as needed until you see consistent and repeatable extrusion.

     

    Now you are ready to print. If you need to make any further adjustments to your model or profile settings, you will need to navigate back to the “Print Setup” button at the top-right corner of the screen. Otherwise, click “Start Print” (4) at the bottom of the print monitor and your print will begin.

    Your printer will home each axis, retract the filament slightly, probe each corner of the print bed, and after priming the hot end with filament will begin printing the Rock2pus.

    Use the included blue-handled knife to remove your Rock2pus after the print surface has moved forward

     

    Explore More Advanced Features

    Once you’ve mastered your first print, you can explore the interface to unlock more advanced features. Cura LE includes profiles for over 30 different filament types, including a number of ornamental and industrial strength copolymers. Explore what's available by clicking the “Material” drop down menu.

    Explore the different view modes by clicking the eye icon on the left-hand side of the screen. "Solid" is the default view of your model, while "X-ray" will make the model translucent, allowing you to see into objects to ensure that inner details are correct. Layer view will show the G-code Cura slices for your model. Use the scroll option in layer view to view each layer of your print. The model will be shown in yellow, green, and red, while support and adhesion options, such as the skirt or brim, will be shown in light blue.

    The custom settings menu can be used to adjust infill, speed, support, and many other slicing options for advanced print tuning and third-party filaments. Access the custom settings mode by clicking the Custom button. Using the search function under the Custom button will help with navigation. Tool tips will appear when you hover over an option to provide details for each setting.

    Add even more customization to your prints by using the “Post Processing” settings under the “Extensions” tab to add pause G-code scripts for multicolor prints, and more.

     

    Filament Guide

    PLA: Polylactic Acid

    PLA is one of the most commonly used 3D printing materials. It's affordable and easy to use, and comes in a huge assortment of colors! It's a unique thermoplastic polymer in that it's derived from renewable resources such as corn starch. As such, it is biodegradeable and not suited for long-term outdoor use or in wet environments. PLA also melts easily in heat, so this is not an ideal filament for high-temperature environments.

    Some PLA filaments are ingrained with wood or metal, and these can be post-processed for unique aesthetics and texture. It's also the ideal material choice for dual-extrusion 3D printing, as it adheres well to not only itself, but PVA-based soluble support materials.

    An enclosure is not necessary when printing with PLA, as ambient temperatures don't affect it. This filament is slightly less robust than ABS, but it's still an excellent choice for rapid prototyping and classroom applications.

    PLA by Verbatim

    Extrusion Temperature: 205°C

    PEI Print Surface Temperature: 60°C

    Part Removal: 60°C

     

    PolyLite PLA by PolyMaker

    Extrusion Temperature: 205°C

    PEI Print Surface Temperature: 60°C

    Part Removal: 60°C

     

    ABS: Acrylonitrile Butadiene Styrene

    This legacy material was the go-to choice for consumer-grade thermoplastics. This material is found in many of the consumer electronics around you right now, due to it's strength, resilience, and slight flexibility.

    How strong and durable is ABS? Strong enough to use in your LulzBot 3D Printer! Almost all of the 3D printed parts are ABS, and were 3D printed in our in-house LulzBot 3D Printer cluster.

    ABS works well at scales that match or are smaller than many of the 3D printed parts found on your LulzBot 3D Printer. Items larger than these examples may warp or crack due to an inherent characteristic of styrene-containing materials, the shrink rate when cooling. While this characteristic works well with injection molding manufacturing methods, it's not ideal for large 3D printed parts. A passively heated enclosure will help maintain a warm environment to minimize warping and cracking.

    ABS by IC3D

    Extrusion Temperature: 240°C - 245°C

    PEI Print Surface Temperature: 95°C

    Part Removal: 50°C

    Tips: Enclosure Recommended.

     

    ABS by Chroma Strand Labs

    Extrusion Temperature: 240°C

    PEI Print Surface Temperature: 95°C

    Part Removal: 50°C

    Tips: Enclosure Recommended.

     

    ABS by Village Plastics

    Extrusion Temperature: 240°C

    PEI Print Surface Temperature: 110°C

    Part Removal: 50°C

    Available also in 5lb Reels.

    Tips: Enclosure Recommended.

     

    Alloy 910 Nylon

    If you're looking for a highly durable filament, this nylon blend is one of the toughest filaments available! Developed by Taulman to provide a material with a high tensile strength and durability, this material is ideal for industrial applications. Its minimal shrink nature and excellent surface bonding properties make this an easy filament to use, and at an affordable price, easily obtainable too! Use Alloy 910 for frames or enclosures subject to stress and high impact, and items subject to repeated flexing such as buckles and clasps.

    Alloy 910 is chemically resistant to alcohols, resins, MEK, oils, acetones, most alkaline substances, and most two-part casting compounds. Color can also be added with most common clothing dyes. Printed parts are heat-resistant up to 93°C (200°F), making it an ideal choice for high-demand environments. A light coating of PVA-based glue stick on the print surface prior to printing with Alloy 910 is recommended for improved bed adhesion.

    Extrusion Temperature: 235°C

    PEI Print Surface Temperature: 100°C

    Part Removal: 60°C

    Tips: Treat PEI Print Surface with PVA Glue Stick.

    Tips: Enclosure Recommended.

     

    bambooFill

    bambooFill combines recycled bamboo fibers with colorFabb PLA for natural-looking, lightweight 3D printed objects. Different printing temperatures will yield different color results: printing with hotter nozzle temperatures will produce a darker color. This material also responds well to sanding for a smooth finish. bambooFill is primarily favored for its aesthetic properties; it is not recommended for printed objects requiring a high degree of durability. Due to the blended nature of this filament, we strongly recommend using a LulzBot Tool Head with a 0.5mm nozzle for optimal 3D printing performance.

    Extrusion Temperature: 190°C

    PEI Print Surface Temperature: 60°C

    Part Removal: 50°C

     

    bioFila Linen

    Made in Germany by twoBEars, this environmentally-friendly filament is composed of organic material and is completely biodegradable. bioFila Linen is a popular choice among artists and educational institutions due to its unique printing properties: it is aesthetically pleasing and forgiving of variances in print temperatures. This material does not contain linen fibers, but rather, lignin, which is a class of organic polymers responsible for providing support structures of vascular plants and some types of algae.

    bioFila Linen has an equivalent impact-resistance to traditional PLA filaments, and a visual texture similar to bone.

    Extrusion Temperature: 200°C

    PEI Print Surface Temperature: 60°C

    Part Removal: 50°C

     

    bioFila Silk

    Also produced in Germany by twoBEars, bioFila Silk is similar to bioFila Linen in its biodegradable, lignin-based nature. It adheres well to the print surface without additional measures, and is generally easy to use. Objects printed with bioFila Silk demonstrate a durability on par with prints made with traditional PLA, and bear a striking aesthetic.This material is recommended for decorative objects due it its glossy, iridescent appearance.

    Extrusion Temperature: 170°C

    PEI Print Surface Temperature: 60°C

    Part Removal: 50°C

     

    Bridge Nylon

    True to the nature of nylon filaments, Bridge Nylon is one of the highest-rated filaments for tensile strength and durability. This copolymer material is named "Bridge" because it bridges the strength of Nylon 645 and the ease of use of traditional ABS and PLA thermoplastics. Similar to Alloy 910, Bridge Nylon has a minimal shrink nature. Parts printed with Bridge Nylon have a tiny bit of give to them when compared to other nylon filaments. Color can also be added with most common clothing dyes.

    One of this material's best qualities is its increased resistance to moisture absorption, making it an optimum choice for high-humidity environments. Placing a light coating of glue stick on the print surface prior to printing with Bridge Nylon is recommended for improved bed adhesion.

    Extrusion Temperature: 230°C

    PEI Print Surface Temperature: 100°C

    Part Removal: 60°C

    Tips: Treat PEI Print Surface with PVA Glue Stick.

    Tips: Enclosure Recommended.

     

    bronzeFill

    bronzeFill combines finely ground bronze powder with premium colorFabb PLA for heavy 3D printed objects that can be sanded and polished to achieve your desired finish. Post-processing will make objects printed with bronzeFill look and feel like metal! In addition, there are oxidation techniques that can be used to give bronzeFill parts a unique patina, making this filament an excellent choice for artistic and aesthetic applications. Non-processed bronzeFill prints have a similar appearance to terra cotta. Due to the blended nature of this filament, we strongly recommend using a LulzBot Tool Head with a 0.5mm nozzle for optimal 3D printing performance.

    Extrusion Temperature: 215°C

    PEI Print Surface Temperature: 60°C

    Part Removal: 50°C

    Tips: Polish your print to expose the shine.

    Tips: Abrade the print and oxidize the surface for a patina.

     

    Coffee PLA

    Perk up your prints with Coffee PLA by Proto-pasta! Made from recycled coffee components, this filament is on par with traditional PLA's ease of use and yields a natural-looking translucent brown finish. This material can be annealed (heat treated) in an oven at 60°C(140°F) - 110°C(230°F) after printing for added strength and heat-resistance. The color of the print will also appear more opaque after annealing, which will give it a more wood-like appearance. Do not leave printed objects unattended while in an oven.

    Extrusion Temperature: 225°C

    PEI Print Surface Temperature: 60°C

    Part Removal: 40°C

    Tips: Anneal your print in the oven for a stronger, stiffer part.

     

    colorFabb_HT

    colorFabb_HT is sturdy and ready for professional-grade applications. Engineered by colorFabb and Eastman Chemical Company, this Eastman Amphora co-polyester combines high temperature resistance and toughness for durable 3D printed objects. This material has a particularly elevated heat resistance of 100°C, making it a great choice for uses such as automotive applications. colorFabb_HT adheres well to our PEI print surface.

    colorFabb_HT 3D prints with little-to-no odor and is styrene-free for warp-free and dimensionally stable parts. This makes colorFabb_HT perfect for interlocking, dimensionally stable 3D printed objects. We strongly recommend applying PVA glue directly on the print surface using a glue stick before printing to ensure easy part removal.

    Extrusion Temperature: 275°C

    PEI Print Surface Temperature: 110°C

    Part Removal: 50°C

    Tips: Treat PEI Print Surface with PVA Glue Stick.

     

    Conductive PLA

    Unleash your inner electrical engineer with this exciting new premium 3D printing filament. Since 3D printed objects have varying structures within them, the resistance across the 3D printed object varies as well! The resistance of the 3D printed object can be different when measured across the sides of the object than the resistance when measured from the top to the bottom.

    Use Conductive PLA filament for low-voltage printed-in-place applications such as contacts, switches, and even internal wiring traces. This premium 3D printing filament can also interact with some touch sensors and even touch screens. Due to the carbon powder blended into this filament, we strongly recommend using a LulzBot Tool Head with a 0.5mm nozzle for optimal 3D printing performance.

    Extrusion Temperature: 215°C

    PEI Print Surface Temperature: 60°C

    Part Removal: 50°C

     

    copperFill

    copperFill combines finely ground copper powder with premium colorFabb PLA for heavy 3D printed objects that can be polished or oxidized to achieve your desired finish. Post-processing will make objects printed with bronzeFill look and feel like metal! In addition, there are oxidation techniques that can be used to give copperFill parts a unique patina, making this filament an excellent choice for artistic and aesthetic applications. Non-processed copperFill prints have a similar appearance to terra cotta. Due to the blended nature of this filament, we strongly recommend using a LulzBot Tool Head with a 0.5mm nozzle for optimal 3D printing performance.

    Extrusion Temperature: 215°C

    PEI Print Surface Temperature: 60°C

    Part Removal: 50°C

    Tips: Polish your print to expose the shine.

    Tips: Abrade the print and oxidize the surface for a patina.

     

    High Temp PLA

    High Temp PLA has two different finishes when 3D printed-- translucent when freshly printed, or opaque when heat-treated! Due to the low warp when 3D printed, High Temp PLA is perfect for objects requiring assembly, dimensional accuracy, and stability.

    Anneal (heat-treat) your 3D printed objects in an oven at 60°C(140°) - 110°C(230°F) for less than an hour, or until your printed object takes on an opaque finish. Once heat-treated, your 3D printed part will be stiffer, stronger, and able to withstand warmer environments up to 140°C (285°F). Do not leave printed objects unattended while in an oven.

    Extrusion Temperature: 225°C

    PEI Print Surface Temperature: 60°C

    Part Removal: 50°C

     

    HIPS

    HIPS is a lightweight, affordable material that is favored for its versatility. This filament is a synthetic copolymer, combining polystyrene and polybutadiene rubber for a tough filament with a fair amount of give.

    Because of its dimensional stability, it's frequently used for pre-production prototyping. It can also be used as support material in dual extrusion 3D printing, as it is soluble in Limonene, a lemon-based solvent that is easily available.

    HIPS is stronger and harder than PLA or ABS, and is not as prone to warping as ABS. This material is easily sanded, can be painted with little difficulty, and works with a variety of adhesives. It's non-hygroscopic, meaning it doesn't attract or absorb moisture from the air.

    Extrusion Temperature: 240°C

    PEI Print Surface Temperature: 110°C

    Part Removal: 50°C

     

    INOVA-1800

    INOVA-1800 prints have a glossy, smooth finish, and feature a great balance of strength and 3D printing ease. 3D prints are dimensionally stable, bridge well and are a great choice for interlocking objects, props, and other functional 3D prints. INOVA-1800 boasts consistent colorant formulation for reliable, repeatable 3D prints.

    INOVA-1800 adheres well to our PEI print surface. We strongly recommend applying PVA glue directly on the print surface using a glue stick (such as Elmer's® brand) before printing to ensure easy part removal.

    Extrusion Temperature: 245°C

    PEI Print Surface Temperature: 70°C

    Part Removal: 50°C

    Tips: Treat PEI Print Surface with PVA Glue Stick.

     

    Laybrick

    Give your custom designs a timeless quality by printing them with Laybrick stone filament. Architectural models, organic shapes, and replicas print well due to the near-zero warping. Paint, sand or grind the model or even vary the print temperature to achieve a smooth finish or a rough texture. Due to the mineral content of Laybrick filament, we strongly recommend using a LulzBot Tool Head with a 0.5mm nozzle for optimal 3D printing performance.

    Extrusion Temperature: 190°C

    PEI Print Surface Temperature: 60°C

    Part Removal: 50°C

     

    Laywoo-D3

    LayWood combines recycled wood fibers with PLA for natural-looking, lightweight 3D Prints. Different printing temperatures yield different color results: printing with hotter nozzle temperatures will produce a darker color. This material also responds well to sanding for a smooth finish. LayWood is primarily favored for its aesthetic properties; it is not recommended for printed objects requiring a high degree of durability. Due to the blended nature of this filament, we strongly recommend using a LulzBot Tool Head with a 0.5mm nozzle for optimal 3D printing performance.

    Extrusion Temperature: 190°C

    PEI Print Surface Temperature: 60°C

    Part Removal: 50°C

     

    Magnetic Iron PLA

    Made with finely ground iron particles and PLA, Magnetic Iron PLA is unique in that it attracts magnetic fields! Objects 3D printed with Magnetic Iron PLA filament can be post-processed to accelerate the iron oxidation process. Printed items may be submerged for 2-3 days for an aged and rusted appearance, or rusted more quickly by applying a special solution made with vinegar, hydrogen peroxide, and salt. Highlight details by polishing raised surfaces on the 3D printed object.

    Suggested uses for Magnetic Iron PLA range from sculptures and busts to architectural details and models. Due to the blended metal powder found in this magnetic 3D printer filament, we strongly recommend using a LulzBot Tool Head with a 0.5mm nozzle for optimal 3D printing performance.

    Extrusion Temperature: 230°C

    PEI Print Surface Temperature: 60°C

    Part Removal: 50°C

    Tips: Polish your print to expose the shine.

    Tips: Abrade the print and oxidize the surface for a patina.

     

    n-vent

    n-vent is a durable polyester filament that boasts a glossy surface finish and is strong and dimensionally accurate due to it's low shrinkage and excellent layer adhesion. n-vent is ideal for interlocking objects as well as functional prototypes.

    It can be sanded or painted directly without any preparation, meaning that aesthetic modifications can be easily made after your objects are 3D printed. Because of Eastman Amphora's wide use as a commercial-grade plastic, n-vent is a popular filament choice among product designers for rapid prototyping.

    n-vent adheres well to our PEI print surface. We strongly recommend applying PVA glue directly on the print surface using a glue stick (such as Elmer's® brand) before printing to ensure easy part removal.

    Extrusion Temperature: 230°C

    PEI Print Surface Temperature: 60°C

    Part Removal: 50°C

    Tips: Treat PEI Print Surface with PVA glue stick.

     

    n-Gen

    ColorFabb nGen filament is engineered for prototyping and production. This co-polyester filament by colorFabb brings together the strength and precision found in Eastman Amphora™ 3300 3D polymer, optimized for desktop 3D printing. Create durable, sturdy prints with this easy-to use filament!

    nGen handles complex models well, including bridging gaps, holes, and overhangs. It also exhibits minimal warping and responds well to post-processing techniques like sanding. This material is ideally suited for interlocking parts due to its low shrink rate and excellent layer adhesion.

    nGen adheres well to our PEI print surface. We strongly recommend applying PVA glue directly on the print surface using a glue stick before printing to ensure easy part removal.

    Extrusion Temperature: 230°C

    PEI Print Surface Temperature: 85°C

    Part Removal: 50°C

    Tips: Printing Large Items? Treat PEI Print Surface with PVA glue stick.

     

    NinjaFlex

    NinjaFlex 3D printing filament performs with an exciting combination of elongation, elasticity, and strength. This fun, flexible material is the strectchiest filament we have ever tested! Its soft, yet durable elasticity makes it ideal for costumes, cell phone cases, covers, grips, and thin sturdy membranes.

    NinjaFlex 3D printing filament adheres exceedingly well to our PEI print surface. We strongly recommend printing on the bare glass side of the Modular Print Bed System or applying PVA glue (white school glue) directly on the print surface using a glue stick (such as Elmer's® brand) before printing to ensure easy part removal.

    Extrusion Temperature: 235°C

    PEI Print Surface Temperature: 40°C

    Part Removal: Off

    Tips: Print on bare glass or treat PEI print surface with PVA glue stick.

     

    Nylon 645

    What makes Nylon 645 unique among its other nylon counterparts is its high optical clarity. Transparency/translucency can be achieved on printed objects, depending on layer thickness. Thanks to this property, Nylon 645 can, for example, be used to print LED and LCD overlays, in addition to items subject to repeated flexing such as buckles and clasps. Nylon 645 is also an excellent choice for printing weight-bearing parts and parts subject to friction.

    Nylon 645 does not have as high a tensile strength as Alloy 910, but it has slightly more than Bridge Nylon. While this material presents a reduced water absorption in comparison to many other nylon filaments, storing it in a sealed container, preferably with a fresh desiccant pack, is recommended.

    645 is a nylon filament material, therefore applying a glue stick (such as Elmer's® brand) directly to the print surface before starting your LulzBot 3D printer is strongly recommended for increased part adhesion.

    Extrusion Temperature: 230°C

    PEI Print Surface Temperature: 110°C

    Part Removal: 60°C

    Tips: Treat PEI print surface with PVA glue stick.

    Tips: Enclosure Recommended.

     

    PC+PBT

    This polycarbonate alloy material produces smooth prints with excellent structural integrity and a high chemical resistance to motor oil and grease, making it ideal for industrial applications in need of long-term fatigue performance, particularly in automotive applications. PC+PBT excels in balancing print stiffness, structural integrity, and impact strength with superb filament ductility.

    PC+PBT filament is a polycarbonate-based material, therefore applying a glue stick (such as Elmer's® brand) directly to the print surface before starting your LulzBot 3D printer is strongly recommended for increased printed object adhesion.

    Extrusion Temperature: 240°C

    PEI Print Surface Temperature: 110°C

    Part Removal: 60°C

    Tips: Treat PEI print surface with PVA glue stick.

    Tips: Enclosure Recommended.

     

    PC-ABS Alloy

    Stronger than ABS and more wear resistant, PC-ABS Alloy brings strength and high temperature resistance to ABS 3D printing filament. Choose PC-ABS Alloy for custom brackets, connectors, clasps, and housings.

    This unique material provides vast improvements (over standard ABS) in heat deflection, impact resistance, rigidity, and ductility. Because ABS filament has a tendency to warp during larger prints, using an enclosure is recommended.

    Applying a glue stick (such as Elmer's® brand) directly to the print surface before starting your LulzBot 3D printer is strongly recommended for increased printed object adhesion.

    Extrusion Temperature: 270°C

    PEI Print Surface Temperature: 110°C

    Part Removal: 50°C

    Tips: Treat PEI print surface with PVA glue stick.

    Tips: Enclosure Recommended.

     

    PC-Max

    PC-Max filament has an advanced polycarbonate-based material that unites impressive mechanical strength, fine surface finishes, and superior heat resistance. Exactly how strong is this stuff? Polymaker put PC-Max to the ultimate test by 3D printing a hook and then used it to lift almost a ton of polycarbonate pellets!

    This material features high-impact resistance and is formulated to minimize warping, making PC-Max perfect for demanding industrial applications like custom cases, fixtures, clasps, and anchors. PC-Max is designed to perform in hot, demanding environments.

    PC-Max is a polycarbonate-based material, therefore applying a glue stick (such as Elmer's® brand) directly to the print surface before starting your LulzBot 3D printer is strongly recommended for increased printed object adhesion.

    Extrusion Temperature: 240°C

    PEI Print Surface Temperature: 100°C

    Part Removal: 50°C

    Tips: Treat PEI print surface with PVA glue stick.

    Tips: Enclosure Recommended.

     

    PCTPE

    PCTPE boasts a unique combination of high strength nylon and flexible thermoplastic elastomer ingredients. This material's ability to bend and twist under duress with minimal stretching is optimal for wearables, cosplay costume harnesses and prop prosthetics, tubing, flexible electronics enclosures, and more. Like other Taulman nylons, PCTPE white 3D printer filament is glossy white with medium-opacity and can be dyed to achieve custom color profiles. Taulman PCTPE filament is also available in our custom LulzBot Green color!

    Taulman PCTPE is a nylon filament material, therefore applying a glue stick (such as Elmer's® brand) directly to the print surface before starting your LulzBot is strongly recommended for better print adhesion.

    Extrusion Temperature: 235°C

    PEI Print Surface Temperature: 100°C

    Part Removal: 50°C

    Tips: Treat PEI print surface with PVA glue stick.

    Tips: Enclosure Recommended.

     

    Polycarbonate

    Polycarbonate is a strong, warp-resistant filament, and in general is good for industrial applications such as fixtures, jigs, and cases.

    Applying a glue stick (such as Elmer's® brand) directly to the print surface before starting your LulzBot 3D printer is strongly recommended for increased printed object adhesion.

    Extrusion Temperature: 290°C

    PEI Print Surface Temperature: 110°C

    Part Removal: 50°C

    Tips: Treat PEI print surface with PVA glue stick.

    Tips: Enclosure Recommended.

     

    PolyFlex

    Composed of 90% thermoplastic urethane (TPU) and 10% polylactic acid or polylactide, commonly known as PLA, this blend exhibits more stiffness and hardness while still retaining flexibility. PolyFlex is perfect for strong printed objects that need to flex while still holding their shape. The manufacturer reports a hardness of 90-95 Shore A which is slightly more flexible than SemiFlex, at 98 Shore A hardness.

    PolyFlex adheres exceedingly well to our PEI print surface. We strongly recommend printing on the bare glass side of the Modular Print Bed System or treat the PEI print surface with PVA glue stick (such as Elmer's® brand) before printing to ensure easy part removal.

    Extrusion Temperature: 220°C

    PEI Print Surface Temperature: 40°C

    Part Removal: Off

    Tips: Print on bare glass or treat PEI print surface with PVA glue stick.

     

    SemiFlex

    SemiFlex performs well as a tough, flexible filament with an exciting combination of pull strength, shock absorption, and print resolution. SemiFlex is a semi-hard flexible filament that comes in several different colors that have a slight sheen after being 3D printed.

    Since SemiFlex is harder than other flexible filaments, complex parts like device cases with overhangs, holes, and details are easier to print while still maintaining its flexible nature. SemiFlex also has applications in robotics due to its ability to function as a tread or grip.

    SemiFlex adheres exceedingly well to our PEI print surface. We strongly recommend printing on the bare glass side of the Modular Print Bed System or treat the PEI print surface with PVA glue stick (such as Elmer's® brand) before printing to ensure easy part removal.

    Extrusion Temperature: 225°C

    PEI Print Surface Temperature: 40°C

    Part Removal: Off

    Tips: Print on bare glass or treat PEI print surface with PVA glue stick.

     

    Stainless Steel PLA

    Stainless Steel PLA is 93% more dense than common 3D printing PLA filament, so 3D printed objects will have a surprising weight to them. You can also make your printed objects look like cast metal through polishing. Post-print processing with successively finer grits of sandpaper and finishing with a cloth wheel minimizes any visible layers while showing off the shiny, metallic finish. Stainless Steel PLA works well for models and figurines, costumes, jewelry, and props.

    Due to the blended metal powder found in this filament, we strongly recommend using a LulzBot Tool Head with a .5mm nozzle for optimal 3D printing performance.

    Extrusion Temperature: 230°C

    PEI Print Surface Temperature: 60°C

    Part Removal: 50°C

    Tips: Polish your print to expose the shine.

    Tips: Abrade the print and oxidize the surface for a patina.

     

    t-glase

    t-glase is clearly a great choice for users seeking a high degree of translucence! This filament is a PETT (polyethylene terephthalate)-based material that is not only easy to use, but has a unique ability to act as a light pipe to transmit light. Printed objects in t-glase are durable and due to the low shrink rate of this material, consistent. It handles bridging well and is most suited for aesthetic applications due to its optical properties. Vases, figurines, lampshades, and light coverings are optimal prints for t-glase.

    This material comes in a wide variety of color choices. The thicker the layer height, the more translucent t-glase prints will be.

    Applying a glue stick (such as Elmer's® brand) directly to the print surface before starting your LulzBot 3D printer is strongly recommended for increased printed object adhesion.

    Extrusion Temperature: 240°C

    PEI Print Surface Temperature: 60°C

    Part Removal: 50°C

    Tips: Print on bare glass or treat PEI print surface with PVA glue stick.

     

    woodFill

    woodFill combines 30% wood fibers with colorFabb PLA for natural-looking, lightweight 3D Prints. Different printing temperatures yield different color results: printing with hotter nozzle temperatures will produce a darker color. This material also responds well to sanding for a smooth finish. woodFill is primarily favored for its aesthetic properties; it is not recommended for printed objects requiring a high degree of durability. Due to the blended nature of this filament, we strongly recommend using a LulzBot Tool Head with a 0.5mm nozzle for optimal 3D printing performance.

    Extrusion Temperature: 190°C

    PEI Print Surface Temperature: 60°C

    Part Removal: 50°C

     

    A special note on Carbon Fiber Filament:

    From: colorFabb.com

    A special point of attention is the abrasive nature of the carbon fibers. In general these fibers will accelerate the nozzle-wear of brass nozzles, much faster than unfilled filaments. Therefore we recommend to use nozzle’s from Stainless steel or hardened copper alloys.

    While it's tempting to try using filament containing carbon fiber, many users are reporting trouble extruding after using that material, even from different vendors. We've seen people that wear out the inside of their nozzle, not to mention having lingering extrusion issues after switching to more common filament types. One of the benefits of carbon fiber containing materials are it's strength, similarly to good quality plywood. The interlocking long carbon fiber strands give the material a super-strong core. All the filaments we've seen so far however, don't have that same kind of long carbon fiber strands, so your prints are similar to Oriented Strand Board (cheaper plywood with smaller fiber length), which isn't as strong or as durable. That somewhat defeats the purpose of using carbon fiber materials. We find that for applications needing high-strength printed parts, Nylon is a great material. While a bit slower to print, the parts are much, much stronger.

     

    Graphical LCD Controller

     

    The Graphical LCD Controller, or GLCD, allows you to print with the LulzBot Mini 2 3D printer without needing to have a computer connected or using host software such as Cura LulzBot Edition. This will allow for more efficient use of the workspace and free up a computer for other tasks.

    In the following sections you will find general information on using the GLCD, how to transfer G-code files to the included SD card, heat up the printer, start a print, and make configuration adjustments.

    Learn more about the LulzBot Mini 2 Graphical LCD Controller here: LulzBot.com/LulzBot-Mini-2-GLCD.

    Graphical LCD Controller, Cura LE or Other Host?

    The Graphical LCD Controller is perfect for normal day to day printing and will be used in the majority of your print jobs. However, in some instances, you will want to use Cura LE instead of the GLCD.

    Cura LE is faster and easier to use when a number of manual movements are required, for example when performing calibration checks. While fine tuning your calibration settings can be performed with the GLCD, it will require a number of repetitive menu selections.

    Just getting started? Use Cura LE, as the inclusion of quick print profiles, the combination of slicing engine, and printer host communications allows for easy all-in-one use.

    Firmware updates cannot be performed through the GLCD. Install the latest firmware automatically through Cura LE.

    Multiple Connections

    Note: Caution is advised when connecting to your printer through USB as the print can be interrupted when connecting or disconnecting the USB cable. In general, once you have started a print with either the GLCD, Cura LE, or another printer host, for the rest of the print use only that controller. When printing with the GLCD, never try to connect through USB—wait until the print is complete, and then connect in Cura LE.

    Saving Print Files To The SD Card

    To print from the GLCD, transfer G-code(.gcode) print files onto the SD card. Follow the normal steps, as explained in the Cura LE section of this guide, to create G-code print files on your computer. Insert the SD card into your computer using a SD card reader slot or USB SD card reader. Open a file browser or file manager and transfer the G-code files. Remove and insert the SD card into the SD card slot on the left side of the GLCD enclosure, located on the right-hand side of the LulzBot Mini 2.

    Graphical LCD Controller Status Screen

    The GLCD screen will turn on when the LulzBot Mini 2 3D printer is powered on. The start-up screen will display the Status screen, the default home screen for the GLCD. This home screen displays the current status of the printer, such as the current temperatures, tool head coordinates, print status, and more. The different numbered sections of the status screen are shown below.

     
     

    1. Hot End Temperature: represents the current temperature (bottom) and set temperature (top) of up to three nozzles. The Einsy Retro control electronics currently only supports one hot end.
    2. Heat Bed Temperature: represents the current temperature (bottom) and set temperature (top) of the heat bed.
    3. Fan Speed: represents the current optional extruder fan speed. The fan is set to off (0%) by default; the fan is not recommended for ABS. If you print with PLA filament, you will want to use the fan. If cooling is turned on in Cura, this portion of the display will change to reflect the .g-code embedded extruder fan control instructions.
    4. Feed Rate: represents the current feed rate setting. The feed rate is set to 100% by default; this matches the speed set in the G-code generation. When on, the status screen selection knob can be turned to increase or decrease the feed rate during the print. Increasing/decreasing the feed rate will increase/decrease the speed of the print.
    5. Printer Status: lists the current status of the printer including: SD card status, current printing file, or completed print time.
    6. Current Print Time: lists the length of time for the current print job.
    7. Progress Bar: represents the progress of the current print job. The print is finished when the bar is completely white.

     

    Graphical LCD Controller Navigation and Selection

    Navigate through the GLCD menu options by rotating to scroll through selections. From the main status screen, press the knob to move into the menu screen. To move backwards in the menu tree, select the top most menu selection on the current screen. Selections that will move you backwards through the menu tree are noted by an upwards-facing arrow. Note: if the menu is left idle it will automatically return to the main status screen.

    Graphical LCD Controller Menu Tree

     
     

    Selecting a File From the SD and Starting a Print

    From the main menu select the Print from SD option. A list of directories and G-code files stored on the SD card will be displayed. Navigate through the menu to locate the file you would like to print. Select the desired file to begin the print.

    Making Manual Movements With the Graphical LCD Controller

    While making numerous manual movements is easier performed through Cura LE, you can make manual movements with the GLCD. Navigate to MovementMove Axis. Select the length of the movement and select which axis to move. When at the move screen, turn the selection knob clockwise to move the axis in millimeters in the positive direction and counter-clockwise for the negative direction.

    Tune Printing Settings During Prints

    Once you begin a print, you will notice your movement option changes to tune. This menu allows for live changes to individual settings while a print is running. You can adjust overall speed, nozzle temperature, bed temperature, flow %, check approximate layer height, and even change filament. When adjusting these settings, we recommend making small changes at a time.

    Change Filament

    You can change filament through the GLCD mid-print by going to TuneChange Filament. This will park your print head in the front left-hand corner, and wait for you to remove the current filament, load new filament, and resume the print. Once your filament change has completed, press in the GLCD knob to resume the print.

    NOTE: Do not attempt to remove filament from the Aerostruder Tool Head by manually turning the gears. Use the Change Filament function in the GLCD or Cura LE to change filament while at extrusion temperature.

    NOTE: If you manually move the tool head while changing filament, your printer may lose its position.

    Configuration Options

    Your LulzBot Mini 2 3D printer has been factory calibrated for printing. However, the GLCD does allow tuning of the more advanced configuration settings. We highly suggest you do not modify the configuration settings unless you are certain it is necessary. The configuration section contains settings that control how your printer operates.

    Changing EEPROM Settings

    The Store Memory and Load Memory functions will store and load the changes you make using the GLCD. You must use the Store Memory function to save the adjusted settings when the printer is powered on. If you ever need to revert to the original factory settings navigate to ControlRestore Failsafe. Doing this will set all configuration settings back to the original factory settings stored in the current firmware.

    Advanced Settings

    In the advanced settings, you can modify your Z-offset, maximum velocity, acceleration, jerk, and Esteps/mm. We highly suggest you not modify the configuration settings unless you are certain it is necessary. Making incorrect adjustments of these settings can have adverse affects on your prints, and potentially damage your machine.

    Z-Offset

    Your LulzBot Mini 2 3D printer has the ability to change the first layer height (Z-offset) directly through the GLCD, even while printing the first layer. Using the GLCD, navigate to ConfigurationAdvanced Settings ▶ Z-Offset. While in this screen you can rotate the GLCD knob counter-clockwise to bring your nozzle closer to the print surface, and rotate it clockwise to bring it farther away from the bed. Push in the GLCD knob to save your settings.

    Acceleration

    Acceleration is the derivative of velocity, and determines how quickly your print head and bed will reach defined speeds. We have this set to 500mm/s2 to help prevent resonance and shadowing. This can be increased for sharper corners and faster turns, however it can lead to backlash issues.

    Jerk Settings

    Jerk is the derivative of acceleration and will determine the maximum change in acceleration allowed at any given time. VXY- Jerk will control jerk setting for your X and Y-axis. VZ – Jerk will control the jerk setting for your Z-axis. VE – Jerk will control the jerk settings for your extruder.

    Vmax

    The Vmax settings will determine the maximum speed that your printer can move on any specific motor(s). We recommend leaving these settings as is. Increasing these speeds too much can lead to skipped steps and/or binding. There will be an individual section for X, Y, Z, and Extruder motors.

    Vmin

    This sets the minimum overall speeds. We have this set to 0 by default to allow greater control through your preferred slicing program.

    VTrav Min

    This will set the minimum travel speed when the tool head is not extruding. We have this set to 0 by default to allow greater control through your preferred slicing program.

    Amax

    The Amax settings will allow you to define a maximum acceleration limit for each motor. Increasing these may reduce print time, but can result in shadowing and resonance issues.

    A-Retract

    This sets the maximum acceleration for retraction moves of the extruder. If this value is set too high it can lead to stripping. Excessively low values can lead to poor print quality. We have this set to 3000mm/s2 by default.

    Steps/mm

    Your LulzBot Mini 2 3D printer is factory calibrated on all axis for accurate movement. These settings control that movement, and if adjusted, your objects will not be properly sized. We only recommend adjusting your Esteps/mm (Extruder Steps Per Unit) as this can be fine tuned for individual tool heads and filaments. Note: Each tool head has a unique extruder steps per unit. The firmware included within Cura LE contains the recommended tool head Esteps. The standard tool head has the Esteps recorded on the Test Acceptance Record.

     

    Maintenance

     

    Little maintenance is required keep your 3D printer running. The following maintenance recommendations will keep your 3D printer producing quality parts. Accelerate your maintenance evaluation schedule if your LulzBot Mini 2 3D printer is under continuous operation or if operated in a dusty environment.

    Monthly

    Nozzle Wiping Pads

    The LulzBot Mini 2 completes a very low-voltage electrical circuit during the bed probing process. If the nozzle or nozzle wiping pads are excessively dirty the bed probing process may fail. This typically occurs when the nozzle wiping pads may be pilled, gouged, or filled with plastic residue. Each nozzle wiping pad can be flipped over once and will need to be replaced when both sides have been utilized. Replacement nozzle wiping pads are available at LulzBot.com/Store/Parts.

    WARNING:

    • Do not attempt to use a plastic or polymer-based wiping pad as it can melt, rather than clean the nozzle.
    • A metal wiping pad should never be used, as it can cause electrical shorts.
    • Abrasive pads should not be used as they can damage the nozzle geometry, leading to poor print quality.

    Hot End

    The hot end can be kept clean of extruded plastic by removing melted plastic strands with tweezers. If melted plastic builds up on the hot end nozzle or heater block, clean it by raising the tool head away from the build plate, and heating to approximately 50°C below your typical extrusion temperature. While wearing a thick leather glove, use a blue shop towel or dry cotton cloth to carefully wipe off the lower metallic portion of the hot end.

    WARNING: Never use a metal wire brush on your hot end as it can cause electrical shorts.

    PEI Print Surface

    If the printed object still lifts off the print surface, clean the PEI surface with IPA/ Isopropyl Alcohol and refresh the PEI surface with a wetsanding procedure. Use 2000-3000 grit sandpaper with a flat sanding block (if available). Apply IPA to the bed and gently sand until the solution is no longer clear and looks cloudy in appearance. Wipe your refreshed PEI surface clean with a clean dry cloth or paper towel. Clean your PEI print surface again to remove any remaining PEI particles. NOTE: Acetone will damage the PEI print surface.

    Semi-Monthly

    Hobbed Bolt

    Filament is pulled through the extruder by a hobbed (or toothed) bolt. After repeated use, the teeth of the hobbed bolt may become filled with plastic. Using the dental pick from the printer kit, clean out the hobbed bolt teeth. If an extruder jam ever occurs, remove the plastic filament from the extruder and clean out the hobbed bolt.

    Smooth Rods

    Wipe the smooth steel rods with a green scrub pad, clean cloth, or paper towel. The linear bushings leave a solid lubricant that builds up over time. Squeaking noises while the printer is in operation is likely a sign that the smooth rods need to be cleaned. NOTE: Never apply any lubricant or cleaning agent to the smooth rods as the bushings are self-lubricating.

    X-, Y-, and Z-axis Belts

    Over long periods of time or after extensive relocating of the printer you evaluate the belt tension on your 3D printer.

    The belt on each axis can be tightened if necessary. Each end of the belt is clamped in place with an M3 screw. This clamp can be loosened with the 2.5mm hex driver included with your LulzBot Mini 2. Use the included needle nose pliers to gently pull the belt tight. Hold the belt tight with one hand and tighten down the M3 screw to secure the belt.

    Quarterly

    Bed Leveling Washers

    Keep the four metal bed leveling washers mounted on each corner of the print surface clean and dust free by wiping them periodically with Isopropyl Alcohol (IPA), and/or a clean dry cloth. If the bed leveling washers are not clean during the bed calibration process the print surface or tool head may be damaged.

    WARNING: Never attempt to clean the bed leveling washers during the probing sequence as it may lead to personal injury.

    Cooling Fans

    Dust may be evident on the two tool head fan blades when the LulzBot Mini 2 is powered off. Clean this dust by:

    • Power off your 3D printer.
    • Gently press your finger against the center of the fan to prevent the fan from moving.
    • Gently blow any dust away with short bursts with a can of compressed air.
    • Power on your 3D Printer and perform a test print to ensure proper operation.

    Note: Contact the Support Team with any questions or concerns.

    Control Box

    If dust is evident on the control box vents, unplug the printer and use short bursts of compressed air to blow out any dust.

     

    Advanced Usage

     

    After you become familiar with printing using the default settings, a few advanced techniques may help in getting better and more consistent prints from the LulzBot Mini 3D printer. Some of these instructions are items and materials not included with the Mini. With any of these additional items or materials, follow safety and usage guidelines as instructed by the manufacturer.

    Changing Hot End Nozzle

    Your hot end is equipped with a 0.50mm nozzle. This nozzle diameter balances print speed, detail, and reliability. Additional tool heads with different nozzle diameters will be available for purchase in the future from LulzBot.com.

    Due to the specific torque of 30 inch pounds required to tighten the nozzle when removed, removing the nozzle is not recommended. Failure to properly tighten the nozzle to the specific recommended torque may lead to leaks or damage if over-tightened.

    Hot end related issues will not be covered under warranty after nozzle changes.

    New Firmware, New Options

    Your LulzBot Mini 2 3D Printer uses Marlin firmware. This community developed firmware uses the information contained in your g-code file to produce your desired object. Marlin includes several safety features, and can be lightly modified through the Graphical LCD Controller or through a direct USB connection with Cura LE.

    Cura LE includes the latest version of 3D printer firmware. Follow the firmware updating instructions available at LulzBot.com/firmware.

    Firmware Update Overview

  • Follow the instructions available at LulzBot.com/Cura to download and install the latest version of Cura LE
  • Open Cura LE
  • Power on your LulzBot 3D Printer and connect it to your computer using the supplied USB cable
  • Record or verify possession of the Extruder steps per unit, by following the steps above
  • Select your LulzBot 3D Printer from the Settings menu
  • Select the Settings menu > Printer > Manage Printer(s) > Upgrade Firmware > Automatically Upgrade Firmware to start the firmware update process
  • Update your Extruder steps per unit and perform a test print
  •  

    Z-axis Offset

    The Z-axis offset, or Z-offset for short, is the distance from the top of the heated bed washers (defined as “zero”) to the tip of the hot end nozzle. This number will always be a negative value—the closer your Z-offset is to zero, the further away from the print surface the hot end nozzle will be moved. Having the correct Z-offset leads to a perfect first layer for consistent print quality, excellent part adhesion, and release.

    The LulzBot Mini 2 Z-axis offset is calibrated in our Colorado factory. Detailed Z-offset recording and updating instructions are available at LulzBot.com/z-offset.

    Z-axis Offset Adjustment

    Your LulzBot Mini 2 3D printer has the ability to change the first layer height (Z-offset) directly through the Graphical LCD Controller and through Cura LE.

    Z-axis Offset Adjustment: GLCD

    From the main GLCD screen, select Configuration.

     

    Select Advanced Settings.

     

    Select Z-Offset.

     

    Adjust the Z-offset by turning the knob counter-clockwise to raise the value, or clockwise to lower it. The Z-offset is a negative number, with zero being identified as the top of the heat bed washers.

    A larger negative Z-axis value brings the hot end nozzle closer to the print surface. A smaller negative Z-axis value will move the nozzle further away from the print surface.

     

    When you have adjusted or restored your Z-offset, select Store Settings from the Configuration menu to save it. You will hear a beep, indicating that the settings have been successfully saved.

     

    Z-axis Offset Adjustment: Cura LE

     

    Connect to your LulzBot 3D Printer using the supplied USB cable and open the console found in the monitor tab.

     

    Type in M851 and press enter.

     

    Type in M851 and press enter to view your current Z-offset.

     

    Type in M851 Z-x.xx substituting x.xx for your desired Z-axis offset and press enter to send the command.

     

    Type in M500 to save this setting to EEPROM.

     

    For in-depth instructions on fine-tuning your Z-offset, refer to the Fine Tuning Your Z-axis Offset OHAI (Open Hardware Assembly Instructions).

     

    Print Adhesion

    Your LulzBot Mini 2 is equipped with a PEI print surface. This revolutionary print surface has been tested by the advanced members of the LulzBot community and has proved to be an easier and more reliable 3D printing surface. When cleaned and heated to the recommended temperatures, your print sticks well without the need for solvents or glues for most materials, the first time and release from the print surface once cooled to the recommended filament-specific object removal temperature.

    The PEI film is adhered to the glass bed plate with a semi-permanent adhesive in order to maximize the lifetime of the PEI print surface. As the interface between the printer and the printed object, the print surface sees the most abuse of any part on your 3D printer and will likely need to be replaced at some point during the life of the printer. The PEI print surface is considered consumable, and may need replacement periodically depending on wear.

    After extended use, some printed objects may lift off the print surface on the corners, along edges, or other areas of the print. Activate the Brim setting in Cura to help increase the surface area of the first layer of the print to improve part adhesion.

    If the printed object still lifts off the print surface, clean the PEI surface with IPA/ Isopropyl Alcohol and refresh the PEI surface with a wet sanding procedure. Use 2000-3000 grit sandpaper with a flat sanding block (if available). Apply IPA to the bed and gently sand until the solution is no longer clear and looks cloudy in appearance. Wipe your refreshed PEI surface clean with a clean dry cloth or paper towel. Clean your PEI print surface again to remove any remaining PEI particles. NOTE: Acetone will damage the PEI print surface.

    While almost all 3D printing filaments will adhere well to the PEI print surface, some materials may need an application of a PVA glue solution/gluestick for improved print adhesion. These materials include nylon- and polycarbonate-based filament.

    Flexible materials such as Ninjaflex, SemiFlex, and some co-polyester-based filaments can adhere too well and should be printed on the bare glass surface or on the PEI surface after a PVA-based glue stick has been applied. NOTE: Printing flexible materials directly on an untreated PEI surface is not recommended as the flexible material may become permanently bonded to the PEI print surface. If this occurs the PEI print surface will require replacement which may not be covered under warranty.

    Detailed PEI print adhesion troubleshooting information is available at LulzBot.com/PEI-troubleshooting.

    Detailed PEI print surface maintenance information is available at LulzBot.com/PEI-maintenance.

    Replacement beds and PEI sheets are available through LulzBot.com/store/parts.

     

    Using 1.75mm filament

    Your LulzBot Mini 3D printer is set up to use 3mm plastic filament by default and may be capable of printing 1.75mm filament with no hardware modification. While many of our advanced users are able to do so, your results may vary. More information can be found at LulzBot.com/using-1-75-filament.

     

    Source

     

    Aleph Objects, Inc., the maker of the LulzBot Mini 2 3D Printer, completely supports Free Software, Libre Innovation, and Open Source Hardware. Along with the LulzBot Mini 2 3D printer being a Free Software and Open Source Hardware design, it has been tested to work with 100% Free/Libre Software. Our source code and design files are hosted on:

  • LulzBot Download Server (static archive): Download.LulzBot.com
  • LulzBot Development Server (files may change without notice): Devel.LulzBot.com
  • Aleph Objects Code Repository Code.AlephObjects.com
  • The LulzBot Mini 2 3D Printer is a Free Software and Open Source Hardware design. All of the source files are available at http://download.lulzbot.com/Mini/2.0.0/ including:

    • The latest version of this document, with HTML source code.
    • 3D models and print files for all of the 3D printed parts in .stl, .gcode, and other original source files.
    • Calibration objects and sample prints.
    • Design files for all electronics and machined parts.
      • LulzBot Aerostruder Tool Head
      • Einsy Retro control electronics
      • Graphical LCD Controller
      • Various spec sheets
    • Bill of materials including every part needed to build the printer.
      • LulzBot Mini 2
      • LulzBot Aerostruder Tool Head
      • Graphical LCD Controller
    • Drawings of components.
      • Sheet Metal
      • LulzBot Aerostruder Tool Head
      • Bed plate
      • Graphical LCD Controller
    • Software binaries and source code for GNU/Linux and others.
      • Cura LulzBot Edition
      • Marlin Firmware
    • Cura LulzBot Edition Print Profiles (vendor- and filament-specific configuration files).
      • LulzBot.com/Cura

    Support

     

    Have Questions? Want Advice?

    Receive fast and friendly help when you need it to maximize up-time. Technical support from our acclaimed team of 3D printing experts is available by phone and email seven days a week from our Colorado headquarters.

    For common technical support questions for your LulzBot Mini 2 3D printer please visit LulzBot.com/Support. Find advice and tips from the LulzBot 3D Printer community in our Forum.LulzBot.com. Please completely read this manual. The latest version of this information guide is available at LulzBot.com/Download.

    Submit a support request: LulzBot.com/Support

    Email: Support@LulzBot.com

    Phone: +1-970-377-1111, option 3

    Regional Phone Numbers

    A complete list of regional phone numbers is available at LulzBot.com/contact.

    Community

    LulzBot User Forum: Forum.LulzBot.com

    LulzBot Tutorials, Announcements, and News: LulzBot.com/Learn

    Step-by-step Guides, Maintenance & Repair Information, and Internal Production Documentation can be found at: OHAI.LulzBot.com (Open Hardware Assembly Instructions)

     

    Warranty & Return Policies

     

    Standard Warranty and Return Policy | Updated August 29, 2017

     

    Standard Warranty
    Download PDF

    Return Policy
    Download PDF

    Extended Warranty

    For less than the cost of a reel of filament a month you can print with confidence knowing that your LulzBot Mini 2 3D Printer will be able to keep up with your 3D printing needs.

    Extend your standard 1 year warranty and support period by purchasing an additional 1, 2, or 3 year warranty and support period.

    Have questions? Need advice? We answer questions and offer guidance over the phone, through email, and online typically within one business day. Have something pressing? Our community-praised Support Team can answer your questions 7 days a week.

    Purchase your extended warranty by contacting our Sales Department through Sales@LulzBot.com or at +1-970-377-1111 x600

     

    Modification Warning

    WARNING: At Aleph Objects, Inc., we respect your freedom to modify your LulzBot desktop 3D printer. However, any modifications or attempted repairs that cause damage are not covered under the Warranty. Questions? Contact Technical Support by emailing Support@LulzBot.com or by calling +1-970-377-1111.

     

    Contact

     

    Support

    Submit a support request: LulzBot.com/Support

    Email: Support@LulzBot.com

    Phone: +1-970-377-1111, option 3

    Sales

    Email: Sales@LulzBot.com

    Phone: +1-970-377-1111

    • Product Information, Quotes, Help Placing Order: Option 1
    • Tracking Information, Help With Existing Order: Option 2

    Regional Phone Numbers

    A complete list of regional phone numbers is available at LulzBot.com/contact.

    Websites

    Aleph Objects, Inc., makers of the LulzBot brand of 3D Printers: AlephObjects.com

    LulzBot 3D Printers, parts, and plastic: LulzBot.com

    LulzBot User Forum: Forum.LulzBot.com

    LulzBot Tutorials, Announcements, and News: LulzBot.com/Learn

    Step-by-step Guides, Maintenance & Repair Information, and Internal Production Documentation can be found at: OHAI.LulzBot.com (Open Hardware Assembly Instructions)

     

    Glossary: Common 3D Printing Terms & Phrases

     

    .GCODE
    The file extension for G-Code files

    Cura
    Cura LulzBot Edition is a cross-platform software package that combines a slicing engine with a printer host interface.

    3D Printer
    Also referred to as additive manufacturing, is the process of fabricating objects from 3D model data, through the deposition of a material in accumulative layers.

    ABS
    Acrylonitrile butadiene styrene thermoplastic. Usually extrudes at 230°C with the Budaschnozzle and 240°C - 250°C with the LulzBot Hexagon Hot End.

    Acetone
    A colorless, volatile, flammable liquid ketone, (CH3)2CO, used as a solvent for ABS.

    CAD
    Computer Aided Design

    FFF Fused Filament Fabrication
    The process of laying down successive layers of extruded filament to create a 3 dimensional object. As each layer of molten plastic is extruded into place, it fuses with the previous layer.

    Filament
    Plastic material in a “string” like form, as it is fed to the printer.

    Free Software
    Free Software (or Free/Libre Software) can be thought of as “free as in free speech, not just free as in free beer”, although most Free Software is available for no cost. Free Software can be copied, modified and is freely available for download.

    G-CODE
    The common name for the most widely used CNC programming language.

    HDPE
    High-density polyethylene.

    Heater block
    Machined from aluminum, the heater block generates heat with a heater resistor and uses a thermistor to measure the temperature.

    Heater resistor
    A special type of resistor that is used to apply heat in a small area.

    HIPS
    High-impact polystyrene. Usually extrudes at 230°C with the Budaschnozzle and 230°C with the LulzBot Hexagon Hot End

    Hot end
    The hot end is the whole part where the plastic melts, including the nozzle, heater block, thermistor, and heat sink. The LulzBot Hexagon Hot End comes standard on the Mini.

    Layer height
    The thickness of each individual deposited layer of the three- dimensional model when cut with a slicing program.

    Laywoo-D3
    Wooden filament similar to PLA. Forty percent of its content consists of recycled wood. Usually prints at 180°C to 210°C. Color can be changed by varying the extrusion temperature.

    Libre Innovation
    Aleph Objects uses Free/Libre Software to build and improve Open Source Hardware so that everything we create is free to be viewed, copied, and/or modified by anyone.

    Nozzle
    The metal tip at the bottom of the hot end. It has a small hole where the plastic filament comes out of the printer.

    Open Source Hardware
    Open source hardware is hardware whose design is made publicly available so that anyone can study, modify, distribute, make, and sell the design or hardware based on that design. The hardware source, the design from which it is made, is available in the preferred format for making modifications to it. For more information visit http://www.oshwa.org/definition/.

    PLA
    Polylactic acid is a corn-based biodegradable polymer. Usually extrudes at 185°C with the Budaschnozzle and 205°C with the LulzBot Hexagon Hot End.

    Polycarbonate
    A strong and impact-resistant thermoplastic. Usually extrudes at 300°C .

    PTFE
    Polytetrafluoroethylene is a synthetic fluoropolymer used in the Budaschnozzle for it’s low coefficient of friction. This limits the TAZ 1-4 Budaschnozzle top extrusion temperature to 250°C. The LulzBot Mini does not use a hot end with a PTFE insert and can reach a 300°C extrusion temperature.

    PVA
    Polyvinyl acetate is the main ingredient in white glue, wood glue and the common school glue stick.RAMBo
    [R]epRap [A)]rduino-[M]ega compatible [M]other [Bo]ard. Designed by Joynnyr (Russell) of UltiMachine.

    Resolution
    In general terms, the resolution you print at can be determined by the layer height you use. The LulzBot Mini can print at layer heights of 0.05mm through 0.50mm with the standard tool head.

    Slic3r
    Slic3r is a cross-platform 3D model slicing engine used to process a 3 dimensional model into the GCODE (tool path) needed to physically generate the print.

    Spool
    Plastic filament coiled and stored on a plastic reel. 3mm filament is referred over 1.75mm filament due to improved feeding and better mounting options.

    Thermistor
    A special type of resistor that changes resistance based on temperature. It is used to measure temperature on the nozzle and the heated bed.

    Threaded extension
    Used to separate the heater block and nozzle from the PEEK insulator. The plastic filament passes through the threaded extension into the melting chamber.

     

    Colophon

     

    LulzBot® Mini 2 3D Printer User Manual

    by Aleph Objects, Inc.

    Copyright © 2016 Aleph Objects, Inc.

    Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International Public License (CC BY-SA 4.0).

    Published by Aleph Objects, Inc., 626 West 66th Street, Loveland, Colorado,80538 USA.

    For more information, call +1-970-377-1111 or go to LulzBot.com and AlephObjects.com.